Creating a New Peacock Wreath

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Creating a new peacock wreath for my Etsy shop! Will share the finished wreath when I’m done! Using ribbon & materials from my Etsy shop!

Simple Joy Crafts

How-to Make a Peacock Wreath with Removable Ribbon Clusters

peacock wreath collage.jpg

At Christmas, I made a wreath like this, adding poinsettias for the season. I really like the peacock ribbon & the colors in the wreath so I decided to make a new wreath that could be used year-round. I also wanted to try a new idea, creating ribbon clusters that could be changed out if I wanted a new look for the wreath. All the materials for the wreath are available in my Etsy craft supply shop. I am including links to each item. However, you can create a similar wreath using materials you buy locally. Let me show you how I created this wreath.

peacock-wreath-tools.gif

I like to gather all my materials before I begin so I’m sure I have everything I need. This applies particularly to the tools I need. Nothing worse than having my hands full of ribbon & realizing I don’t have my scissors near by! I LOVE this little table. It is easy to store & I can set it up almost everywhere. It is also easy to take along when I am working in another location. As you can see, I have used the table a lot! It might look dingy but it works great & every mark or splash of paint reminds me how much fun I have creating my projects.

peacock-ribbon-&-mesh.gif

I used turquoise 21″ standard deco mesh for the base of my wreath. I like a fluffy wreath so I tend to use the entire roll. The peacock ribbon is 2 1/2″ wide & wired on the sides. It has a bit of glitter shot through.

gold-&-ivory-ribbon.gif

I thought this sheer gold & ivory ribbon went well with the peacock ribbon. I often use 2 different ribbons on my wreaths.

gold & blue tulle.gif

I like using a 14″ wire wreath. This gives me a finished wreath of 20-24″ depending on how much I fluff out the ribbon. I carry this wire wreaths but you can also find them locally. Dollar Tree has been carrying them so check there before you spend more.

Last year, I began using 6″ rolls of tulle with my wreaths. The tulle adds fullness to my wreaths at a low cost. The tulle also lets the deco mesh show through. For this wreath, I used turquoise shimmer tulle & gold metallic tulle. I will warn you. The metallic tulle & glitter tulle gets all over everything! When I use it, my daughter Katy scolds me because our cat, Mimi ends up all glittery! Just a word of caution. I may begin working outside when I work with the glitter tulle.

zip-ties.gif

I now use zip ties to attach the deco mesh & to create my ribbon clusters. I use chenille pipe cleaners to attach the ribbon clusters to the wreath but I find the zip ties keep everything nice & tidy! I admit to being just a bit OCD! I buy my zip ties at Harbor Freight in black & white. Look for coupons & you can get them for a song!

scissors-&-wire-cutters.gif

Scissors, wire cutters & the pipe cleaners! I’m ready to begin!

beginning-the-wreath.gif

I attach the deco mesh to the second & fourth rings from the inside. I like to begin on the inside & work my way out. I start by making my first attachment at a cross bar. This helps anchor the start.

beginning-the-wreath-2.gif

Once I have made the first attachment, I go back & zip tie the end of the mesh to the wreath. I like to keep the back of the wreath as tidy as possible.

measuring-the-mesh.gif

I find the easiest way to measure out a length of mesh for a pouf is by holding the last attachment, then stretching the mesh out to the crook of my elbow. For me, this is much easier than trying to measure out each length with a ruler or marking on the table.

Now, I am tall so you may need to go higher up your arm to measure out enough material. Of course, if you don’t want such a big pouf, you should decide how far up your arm you need to go.

puff-of-mesh.gif

I do an attachment at the cross bar & a second in the middle, between cross bars, for each section. I keep fluffing the poufs as I go along.

2-poofs.gif

One completed section with 2 poufs.

half-way-through-ring-1.gif

Halfway through the first ring. You can see how puffy the mesh is.

ring-1-done.gif

Ring one done.

the-zip-ties.gif

This is the bottom of the wreath once the first ring is finished. At this point, I tighten the zip ties & clip them.

clipping-the-zip-ties.gif

clipped-zip-ties.gif

Now to begin the second layer of mesh on the fourth or outside ring. Let me add this, I use the second & fourth rings for 2 simple reasons: Sometimes, I add a sign or decoration in the center of the wreath. If I began on the inner ring, there would be no room for the decoration. Second, if I want to add a second or third color (assuming I use 2 different colors on the second & fourth rings) I need the third ring to attach it.

moving-on-to-ring-2.gif

When you finish the first layer, you should overlap the mesh so it ends where it began. Otherwise, you have a gap. Then, pull your mesh tight up the cross bar & attach it to the fourth ring. Now you are ready to begin the second layer of mesh. Proceed to attach the mesh exactly like you did for the first layer.

wrapping-up-the-end.gif

When I got to the end, I had about 1 foot of mesh left. I cut part of it off, then attached it to the wreath in at least 2 places so it was nice & tidy. Then I tightened & cut the zip ties again.

tape-on-the-tape.gif

Now it was time to measure out the ribbon, I decided to make the ribbons 18″ long. I like to cut all the ribbon & tulle out at one time. to make it easy, I measure out the length I plan to use & place tape on my table. All I have to do then is measure out each length of ribbon using the tape as a guide.

angling-edges.gif

I clip the ribbon to create a V on each end. Now it’s time to stack the ribbon & tulle to make the clusters.

gathering-the-ribbons.gif

I recently learned about a handy device called Bowdabra. It comes in 2 sizes. One makes large bows, like the one for my wreaths & the smaller one is perfect for making hair bows. I want both of these. However, I can’t afford them right now. So I got creative. The Bowdabra holds the ribbon in place as you stack the assortment of ribbon. As I looked at the device, I realized I could just use a plastic closer from a loaf of bread! It works perfectly! I began with the peacock ribbon, then the ivory, the turquoise tulle finally the gold tulle. The four pieces fit just fine.

gathered-ribbons-side.gif

Here’s a shot from the side!

zip-tie-the-ribbons.gif

With the bread closer still in place, I zip tied the ribbons together. I pull the tie tight, then clip off the end. The zip tie hold my ribbons together nice & tight. I create all my ribbon clusters. I made 16. I only added 12 at first to see how it looked. Then I added the other 4 where I felt the wreath needed ribbon.

3-clusters-on-wreath.gif

I wanted to show you 2 other ribbon clusters I created that could be used with this wreath. I plan to add cluster to my shop but for now, you can do this yourself. Why clusters? Well, let me give you an example. I am preparing to make an owl wreath. I am using red mesh for the base. I can use that wreath throughout the year. The owl ribbon clusters can be taken off & replaced with patriotic ribbons, Valentine’s ribbons, & Christmas ribbons. One wreath that can be used throughout the year. You can store the ribbon clusters to use year after year.

cut-pipe-cleaners-in-half.gif

I use pipe cleaners to attach the ribbon clusters to the wreath. I cut them in half. Not only is this plenty but I also clip a bit off the back when I am done. I don’t like to waste materials so cutting them in half saves resources.

begin-adding-ribbon-clusters.gif

As I said above, I added the ribbon clusters to the wreath, usually at the same points where I attached the mesh to the wire wreath. You can use any number of clusters. You can even create different clusters to mix & match on the wreath. I feel you should add clusters in groups of 4. This works well & keeps the wreath balanced.

finished-wreath.gif

Here is the completed wreath. I really like the way the colors compliment one another.

completed-wreath.gif

This is a close up.

I made this wreath in one evening. Sometimes I take a day or two to make a wreath. I find the zip ties make the process go smoother. And faster.

While this may seem like a complicated process, it really isn’t. It just takes practice. I find the wreaths I make today are better than my first wreaths. I have found ways to improve on my technique as time has passed.

Next, I will be making the owl wreath which includes a cute owl sign in the middle. Soon, I will show you how to make a wreath using 2-3 colors.

You can use these instructions to make a wreath in any design you want. I often begin with the printed ribbon & go from there. For ideas, please visit my craft supply store: Simple Joy Crafts. And if you would like me to make you a peacock wreath of your own, contact me! I can do part or all of it for you!

Questions. Ideas. Tips or more. Just contact me or make a comment below. Oh, & I would LOVE to see the wreaths you make. Enjoy!

How-to Make a Peacock Wreath with Removable Ribbon Clusters

peacock wreath collage.jpg

At Christmas, I made a wreath like this, adding poinsettias for the season. I really like the peacock ribbon & the colors in the wreath so I decided to make a new wreath that could be used year-round. I also wanted to try a new idea, creating ribbon clusters that could be changed out if I wanted a new look for the wreath. All the materials for the wreath are available in my Etsy craft supply shop. I am including links to each item. However, you can create a similar wreath using materials you buy locally. Let me show you how I created this wreath.

peacock-wreath-tools.gif

I like to gather all my materials before I begin so I’m sure I have everything I need. This applies particularly to the tools I need. Nothing worse than having my hands full of ribbon & realizing I don’t have my scissors near by! I LOVE this little table. It is easy to store & I can set it up almost everywhere. It is also easy to take along when I am working in another location. As you can see, I have used the table a lot! It might look dingy but it works great & every mark or splash of paint reminds me how much fun I have creating my projects.

peacock-ribbon-&-mesh.gif

I used turquoise 21″ standard deco mesh for the base of my wreath. I like a fluffy wreath so I tend to use the entire roll. The peacock ribbon is 2 1/2″ wide & wired on the sides. It has a bit of glitter shot through.

gold-&-ivory-ribbon.gif

I thought this sheer gold & ivory ribbon went well with the peacock ribbon. I often use 2 different ribbons on my wreaths.

gold & blue tulle.gif

I like using a 14″ wire wreath. This gives me a finished wreath of 20-24″ depending on how much I fluff out the ribbon. I carry this wire wreaths but you can also find them locally. Dollar Tree has been carrying them so check there before you spend more.

Last year, I began using 6″ rolls of tulle with my wreaths. The tulle adds fullness to my wreaths at a low cost. The tulle also lets the deco mesh show through. For this wreath, I used turquoise shimmer tulle & gold metallic tulle. I will warn you. The metallic tulle & glitter tulle gets all over everything! When I use it, my daughter Katy scolds me because our cat, Mimi ends up all glittery! Just a word of caution. I may begin working outside when I work with the glitter tulle.

zip-ties.gif

I now use zip ties to attach the deco mesh & to create my ribbon clusters. I use chenille pipe cleaners to attach the ribbon clusters to the wreath but I find the zip ties keep everything nice & tidy! I admit to being just a bit OCD! I buy my zip ties at Harbor Freight in black & white. Look for coupons & you can get them for a song!

scissors-&-wire-cutters.gif

Scissors, wire cutters & the pipe cleaners! I’m ready to begin!

beginning-the-wreath.gif

I attach the deco mesh to the second & fourth rings from the inside. I like to begin on the inside & work my way out. I start by making my first attachment at a cross bar. This helps anchor the start.

beginning-the-wreath-2.gif

Once I have made the first attachment, I go back & zip tie the end of the mesh to the wreath. I like to keep the back of the wreath as tidy as possible.

measuring-the-mesh.gif

I find the easiest way to measure out a length of mesh for a pouf is by holding the last attachment, then stretching the mesh out to the crook of my elbow. For me, this is much easier than trying to measure out each length with a ruler or marking on the table.

Now, I am tall so you may need to go higher up your arm to measure out enough material. Of course, if you don’t want such a big pouf, you should decide how far up your arm you need to go.

puff-of-mesh.gif

I do an attachment at the cross bar & a second in the middle, between cross bars, for each section. I keep fluffing the poufs as I go along.

2-poofs.gif

One completed section with 2 poufs.

half-way-through-ring-1.gif

Halfway through the first ring. You can see how puffy the mesh is.

ring-1-done.gif

Ring one done.

the-zip-ties.gif

This is the bottom of the wreath once the first ring is finished. At this point, I tighten the zip ties & clip them.

clipping-the-zip-ties.gif

clipped-zip-ties.gif

Now to begin the second layer of mesh on the fourth or outside ring. Let me add this, I use the second & fourth rings for 2 simple reasons: Sometimes, I add a sign or decoration in the center of the wreath. If I began on the inner ring, there would be no room for the decoration. Second, if I want to add a second or third color (assuming I use 2 different colors on the second & fourth rings) I need the third ring to attach it.

moving-on-to-ring-2.gif

When you finish the first layer, you should overlap the mesh so it ends where it began. Otherwise, you have a gap. Then, pull your mesh tight up the cross bar & attach it to the fourth ring. Now you are ready to begin the second layer of mesh. Proceed to attach the mesh exactly like you did for the first layer.

wrapping-up-the-end.gif

When I got to the end, I had about 1 foot of mesh left. I cut part of it off, then attached it to the wreath in at least 2 places so it was nice & tidy. Then I tightened & cut the zip ties again.

tape-on-the-tape.gif

Now it was time to measure out the ribbon, I decided to make the ribbons 18″ long. I like to cut all the ribbon & tulle out at one time. to make it easy, I measure out the length I plan to use & place tape on my table. All I have to do then is measure out each length of ribbon using the tape as a guide.

angling-edges.gif

I clip the ribbon to create a V on each end. Now it’s time to stack the ribbon & tulle to make the clusters.

gathering-the-ribbons.gif

I recently learned about a handy device called Bowdabra. It comes in 2 sizes. One makes large bows, like the one for my wreaths & the smaller one is perfect for making hair bows. I want both of these. However, I can’t afford them right now. So I got creative. The Bowdabra holds the ribbon in place as you stack the assortment of ribbon. As I looked at the device, I realized I could just use a plastic closer from a loaf of bread! It works perfectly! I began with the peacock ribbon, then the ivory, the turquoise tulle finally the gold tulle. The four pieces fit just fine.

gathered-ribbons-side.gif

Here’s a shot from the side!

zip-tie-the-ribbons.gif

With the bread closer still in place, I zip tied the ribbons together. I pull the tie tight, then clip off the end. The zip tie hold my ribbons together nice & tight. I create all my ribbon clusters. I made 16. I only added 12 at first to see how it looked. Then I added the other 4 where I felt the wreath needed ribbon.

3-clusters-on-wreath.gif

I wanted to show you 2 other ribbon clusters I created that could be used with this wreath. I plan to add cluster to my shop but for now, you can do this yourself. Why clusters? Well, let me give you an example. I am preparing to make an owl wreath. I am using red mesh for the base. I can use that wreath throughout the year. The owl ribbon clusters can be taken off & replaced with patriotic ribbons, Valentine’s ribbons, & Christmas ribbons. One wreath that can be used throughout the year. You can store the ribbon clusters to use year after year.

cut-pipe-cleaners-in-half.gif

I use pipe cleaners to attach the ribbon clusters to the wreath. I cut them in half. Not only is this plenty but I also clip a bit off the back when I am done. I don’t like to waste materials so cutting them in half saves resources.

begin-adding-ribbon-clusters.gif

As I said above, I added the ribbon clusters to the wreath, usually at the same points where I attached the mesh to the wire wreath. You can use any number of clusters. You can even create different clusters to mix & match on the wreath. I feel you should add clusters in groups of 4. This works well & keeps the wreath balanced.

finished-wreath.gif

Here is the completed wreath. I really like the way the colors compliment one another.

completed-wreath.gif

This is a close up.

I made this wreath in one evening. Sometimes I take a day or two to make a wreath. I find the zip ties make the process go smoother. And faster.

While this may seem like a complicated process, it really isn’t. It just takes practice. I find the wreaths I make today are better than my first wreaths. I have found ways to improve on my technique as time has passed.

Next, I will be making the owl wreath which includes a cute owl sign in the middle. Soon, I will show you how to make a wreath using 2-3 colors.

You can use these instructions to make a wreath in any design you want. I often begin with the printed ribbon & go from there. For ideas, please visit my craft supply store: Simple Joy Crafts. And if you would like me to make you a peacock wreath of your own, contact me! I can do part or all of it for you!

Questions. Ideas. Tips or more. Just contact me or make a comment below. Oh, & I would LOVE to see the wreaths you make. Enjoy!